Werewolf and Also Were-Everything

Immortal Lycanthropes by Hal Johnson

immortal lycanthropes

First Look:

Pretty, pretty animals!

Jacket Copy:

“A shameful fact about humanity is that some people can be so ugly that no one will be friends with them. It is shameful that humans can be so cruel, and it is shameful that humans can be so ugly.”

So begins the incredible story of Myron Horowitz, a disfigured thirteen-year-old just trying to fit in at his Pennsylvania school. When a fight with a bully leaves him unconscious and naked in the wreckage of the cafeteria, Myron discovers that he is an immortal lycanthrope—a were-mammal who can transform from human to animal. He also discovers that there are others like him, and many of them want Myron dead. “People will turn into animals,” says the razor-witted narrator of this tour-de-force, “and here come ancient secrets and rivers of blood.”

Sequel?

I don’t think so.

Worth Reading?

confused

Um, I guess so?  I have complicated feelings on this one.

Notable Things:

Lemonysnicketgrave

Awesome Narration!  The narrator reminded me a lot of Lemony Snicket, but he had his own flavor, too.  Two very good things.

meandering

Meandering Plot.  I couldn’t figure out why certain passages were in the book (one in particular).  They didn’t tie in, they just sort of delayed Myron on his journey.

redpanda

Beautiful Illustrations!  Teagan White does lovely B&W realistic animals, as well as some embellishments throughout the book.

Elaboration:

I fell in love with the illustrations and the first line (beginning of the jacket copy above).  It was certainly not the title, as I’m not too big on werewolves (except for Lord Maccon, obviously).  I found many passages to love throughout the book; Johnson sprinkled these lovely bits of narration all over.  However, I spent a lot of the book in a state of confusion.  Where was the plot heading?  Was there a point?  Would we ever learn Myron’s animal?  Why was everyone fighting over him?  Where has his memory gone?  Some of these questions are never quite answered.  It was, however, enjoyable to read, and the ending was lovely.  I guess I will have to give this a qualified recommendation.

Disclosure:

Borrowed from work.

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